Category Archives: museums

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. “Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem)” 26-foot-tall sculpture was created, and installed in front of the Arnold and Joan Saltzman Fine Art Building, by artist Marko Remec, at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work. 

Nassau County Museum of Art: Reflections on Times & Space

From LONG ISLAND – by Ann Parry (ann-parry.com)
July 16, 2019

Deciding to take advantage of the nice-in-the-shade weather the first weekend in July, my friend Bob and I went to the Nassau County Museum of Art on Sunday, the last day of its “That 80s Show” exhibit. I also looked forward to seeing Animodules at the Manes Center, and new outdoor sculptures by conceptual artist Marko Remec

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. [NOTE: YELLOW filter added to image]  “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of domed mirrors was created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. [yellow filter added to image]  “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of domed mirrors was created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

  • Click each photo to see a different, related image

After parking, we walked up the path leading to the Saltzman Fine Art Building, when I saw Pamela, a friend and fellow photographer, a few yards away from us, chatting with someone as they headed toward the parking lot. 

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. PAMELA WALDROUP poses next to bronze sculpture

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. PAMELA WALDROUP poses next to bronze sculpture “Girl on a Bicycle “(1964) by Bruno Lucchesi, on the grounds of the Nassau County Museum of Art, Long Island. (© 2019 Ann Parry, Ann-Parry.com)

After getting Pamela’s attention, we laughed… for ever since the exhibit opened, we’d planned to see it, but weather and scheduling conflicts got in our way. Now, serendipity had landed us at the same space at the same time, so we could at least capture a few photos by the “Girl on a Bicycle” (1964) sculpture by Bruno Lucchesi.

That 80s Show

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7 2019. During last day of

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7 2019. During last day of “That 80s Show” exhibit at Nassau County Museum of Art, visitors are in gallery, with paintings from left to right: “Toward the Brightest Light,” 1986, by Julian Schnabel (b. 1951); (at center) “Southern Comfort, “1984, by Sandro Chia (b. 1946); “The Human Comedy, 1987, by Annette Lemieux (b. 1957); (above mantel) “Easter Painting,” 1982, by Gregory Amenoff (b. 1948). (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

After renewing my membership, I entered a spacious gallery hung with five huge paintings and a few smaller, though not small, ones.  [See above photo]

Since the gallery was part of the “That 80s Show” exhibit, it wasn’t chance the artists and I shared birthdays within about ten years of each other.

Two of the artists died at tragically young ages, and, as I feared, it was of tragically times-related causes. Jean-Michel Basquiat was only 27 when he died in 1984 of a heroin overdose. Tseng Kwong Chil was only 40 when he died in 1990 of an AIDS-related illness – which, near the same time, stole my much missed, musically gifted brother in his thirties. 

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Visitor looks at artwork from Men in the Cities series by Robert Longo (b. 1953). From L-R, the first 3 are Untitled, analog silver gelatin prints, 20 x 16 inches; at extreme right is “Men in the Cities: Eric,” (1983), lithograph on rag paper, 71 1/2 x 35 7/8 inches. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Visitor looks at artwork from Men in the Cities series by Robert Longo (b. 1953). From L-R, the first 3 are Untitled, analog silver gelatin prints, 20 x 16 inches; at extreme right is “Men in the Cities: Eric,” (1983), lithograph on rag paper, 71 1/2 x 35 7/8 inches. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

More than once, I was struck how visitors looking at artwork impacted, even transformed, the experience. The above photo of a man looking at works from the “Men in the Cities” series by Robert Longo is one example, and a different man near a different lithograph by Robert Longo is another.

Animodules

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. The Wolf Animodule is on display at the exhibition of Animodules, an urban artform of nonviolent superheroes, at the Manes Center at Nassau County Museum of Art, on Gold Coast of Long Island. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. The Wolf Animodule is on display at the exhibition of Animodules, an urban art form of nonviolent superheroes, at the Manes Center at Nassau County Museum of Art on Long Island. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Animodules – an original urban art form of nonviolent super heroes – were on display both inside and outside the Manes Center. They filled the large room with a positive, vibrant energy.

These Agents of Peace were first created at the Barat Foundation, a non profit in Newark, New Jersey.

Animodules Mission: “Transforming lives and communities through collaborative public art to promote peace, social justice, diversity, and beautification of public space.” 

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Commissioned Artist Animodules - 13 inches, handp-painted on aluminum by artists of the Bridge Art Gallery - are inside display case at the exhibition of Animodules, an urban artform, at the Manes Center at Nassau County Museum of Art, on Long Island. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Commissioned Artist Animodules – 13 inches, hand-painted on aluminum by artists of the Bridge Art Gallery – are inside display case at the exhibition of Animodules, an urban art form, at the Manes Center at Nassau County Museum of Art, on Long Island. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

This is the first museum exhibition for Animodules, and it runs through to September 15, 2019. 

Final Reflections

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of domed mirrors was created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of domed mirrors was created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

Perhaps in part because I’m fond of (literally) shiny things, I’m a fan of Marko Remec’s three outdoor sculptures commissioned by the Nassau County Museum of Art.

Remec’s “The Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” was a short make-your-own-path walk from the Manes Center, and typically would be viewed from the road, where one wouldn’t notice a couple of dome mirrors were damaged and some were removed from the end.

The convex dome mirrors of the other two sculptures – the 26-foot-tall “Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem)” [see feature photo at top of this post] and the horizontal “NYET” – were fine off the ground on well-beaten paths.

Even if the sweaty-in-the-open-field weather didn’t stop me from spending quite as much time as I’d like to capture far and close up views of the Field Totem, I’d want to return with my Nikon during each of the seasons.

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Close up of part of “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of dome mirrors, which was created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art. (Ann Parry/Ann Parry, ann-parry.com)

Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. Close up of part of “Vertebrate Progression (Field Totem)” outdoor sculpture of dome mirrors, created and installed by artist Marko Remec near the Manes Center at the Nassau County Museum of Art. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)


Feature Photo at top of post Roslyn, New York, U.S. July 7, 2019. “Would That I Wish For (Tall Totem)” 26-foot-tall sculpture was created, and installed in front of the Arnold and Joan Saltzman Fine Art Building, by artist Marko Remec, at the Nassau County Museum of Art, which commissioned the work.


NCMA Reflections:  PHOTO GALLERY

Nassau County Museum of Art:  Site  •  Join

Barat Foundation:  Animodules  Agents of Peace

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Garden City, New York, USA. May 23, 2019. At left, ANDREW PARTON, President of the Cradle of Aviation Museum is standing at lectern and introducing, at right, ANDREW CHAIKIN, best-selling author of "A Man on the Moon: The Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts" in the museum’s JetBlue Sky Theater Planetarium. Event was part of CAM's celebration of 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11.

Andrew Chaikin: Over the Moon about Space

From LONG ISLAND – by Ann Parry (ann-parry.com)
May 30, 2019

VIDEO 1 [00:21] Chaikin’s favorite quote:

An Evening with Andrew Chaikin, at the Cradle of Aviation Museum, Thursday, May 23, began with refreshments near the “LEM” room, home of the actual Apollo LM-13 lunar excursion module built for the cancelled Apollo 18 mission.

What a great setting for photos of the bestselling author of “A Man on the Moon: Voyages of the Apollo Astronauts”!

And when asked if I wanted him to go on the surface of the (simulated) moon – the first time anyone offered that in all the years I captured photos there – I was so surprised I blurted out, “Are you sure it’s okay?” He smiled and good-naturedly assured me he had permission. 

Garden City, New York, USA. May 23, 2019. At left, author ANDREW CHAIKIN takes a selfie with ALAN CONTESSA, who worked on the real Apollo 11 lunar module, as they stand in front of the genuine Lunar Module LM-13, built for cancelled Apollo 18 mission.

Garden City, New York, USA. May 23, 2019. At left, ANDREW CHAIKIN takes a selfie with ALAN CONTESSA, who worked on the Apollo 11 lunar module, as they stand in front of the genuine Lunar Module LM-13, built for cancelled Apollo 18 mission. (© 2019 Ann Parry/Ann-Parry.com)

After capturing photos of Chaikin at LM-13, I saw a few guests come in, including Alan Contessa, who, as a 22-year-old Grumman employee in 1969, was responsible for making and installing the gold silver thermal foil covering the lower part of Apollo 11’s lunar excursion module LM-5, the “Eagle” of “The Eagle has landed” fame.

My favorite LM area photo of the evening shows Chaikin taking a selfie with Contessa as they’re standing in front of the LM-13 thermal foil, which Contessa, as a volunteer, worked on for the Cradle of Aviation display.

Soon it was time to go to the JetBlue Sky Theater Planetarium, for Chaikin’s talk about growing up on Long Island and interviewing Apollo astronauts.

VIDEO 2 [44:10] Chaikin’s talk:

Chaikin became obsessed with space when he was five, and he was 12 when he met his first NASA astronaut, Alan Bean, who later became his dear friend and mentor.  

Young Chaikin literally dreamed of meeting Neil Armstrong and getting his autograph. During a trip with his parents to Washington DC in 1971, he found out Armstrong was working at NASA Headquarters. The second time Chaikin went to HQ, he ran into Armstrong in the hallway, where the astronaut signed an autograph for him, and then took a selfie of the two of them.

As adults, they got to know each other as friends, and in 2002 Chaikin’s wife Victoria Kohl took a picture of Armstrong and Chaikin, who was holding that 1971 selfie.

Chaikin, an animated, knowledgable, and fascinating speaker – and I’m not saying that just because we have the same birthday – talked about the Apollo 11 mission in great detail, with photos and videos projected on the huge screen behind him. NOTE: Video 2 above includes most of Chaiken’s talk.

During the Q&A, the first guest called on asked if Chaikin thought the [2018 biographical drama] movie “First Man” portrayed astronaut Neil Armstrong accurately. The audience laughed when Chaikin quickly answered, “Not at all….”

The evening ended with the CNN Films documentary “APOLLO 11,” but I had to leave before it ran on the giant curved screen, so I returned to the IMAX theater with a friend to see the film that Sunday afternoon.

Walking up and up and up the theater stairs, we turned into the second row from the top, sat down, and enjoyed the awe-inspiring, newly unearthed views of the Apollo 11 astronauts, support teams, and the mission itself.


Feature Photo at top of post: Garden City, NY, USA. May 23, 2019. At left, ANDREW PARTON, Pres. of the Cradle of Aviation Museum introduces, at right, author ANDREW CHAIKIN in the museum’s JetBlue Sky Theater Planetarium.


Andrew Chaikin at Cradle of Aviation:  MY GALLERY

Video 1 – Chaikin’s Favorite Quote: vimeo.com/annparry/chaikinquote
Video 2 – Chaikin’s Talk: vimeo.com/annparry/chaikintalk

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